May 9, 2017 By Terry Devitt Item Information:

\u003Cstrong\u003EEach style features a sweet, fruity scent!\u003C\u002Fstrong\u003E

Classic and cool, these Cienta® Kids sneakers are sure to add some extra style to any outfit.

Textile upper with a branded patch at the heel.

Slip-on design with stretchy elastic across the instep.

Breathable textile lining and a textile-covered footbed to keep feet cool and dry.

This style is built without an insole for an environmentally friendly design.

Stylish rubber toe cap.

Durable rubber outsole.

Made in Spain.

Product measurements were taken using size 25 (US 8 Toddler), width M. Please note that measurements may vary by size.

Weight of footwear is based on a single item, not a pair.

G.H. Bass & Co. Dirty Buck 2.0 WingEtnies Black-Pink-Pink Scout Womens Shoe,DAME115/G/PU Funtasma Women's Boots GOLD Size: 7ABEO - Shearling Orthotic-Metatarsal Mens - Orthotics ,Inexpensive, stylish shoes,Kadisha Womens Flats Low Heels Diamante Crystal Strappy Sandals Ladies Shoes NewASICS Kids GEL-Contend 4 GS (Big Kid)< explosion tableSperry Fathom Sneaker (Little Kid & Big Kid)Half-insoles CLARKS - James Wing 261348797 British Tan Leather - Formal shoes - Low shoes - Men's shoesBrinley Co. Women's Wide Calf Vintage Almond Toe Over-the-knee BootsNew Balance 24v1 Sneaker (Baby & Toddler),Merrell Work Fullbench SR:Modern Fashion:Man's/Woman's,Zealand - Iona - Sandals ,Inexpensive, stylish shoes-authentic-Mr/MsG.H. Bass & Co. Ebbie largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi.

“Neo” skull of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. The skull has been painstakingly reconstructed, providing a much more complete portrait of the early hominin. Photo: John Hawks CC-BY

The discovery, announced today (May 9, 2017) with the publication of a series of papers in the journal eLife, helps round out the picture of a creature that scientists now know shared the landscape with modern humans — and probably other hominin species — between 226,000 and 335,000 years ago. The discovery of the new fossils representing the remains of at least three juvenile and adult specimens includes a “wonderfully complete skull,” says University of Wisconsin–Madison anthropologist John Hawks.

The new chamber is also exceedingly difficult to access, requiring those excavating the fossils to crawl, climb and squeeze their way in pitch dark to the fossil cache.

Homo naledi was very different from archaic humans that lived around the same time. Left: Kabwe skull from Zambia, an archaic human. Right: “Neo” skull of Homo naledi. Photo: John Hawks CC-BY

Sept. 10, 2015: Fossil Trove Adds a New Limb to Human Family Tree

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